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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)
's possible use of chemical weapons. >> brown: then, we examine the use of a one-drug lethal injection on a prisoner last night in texas-- the state that executes more convicts than any other. >> suarez: as delegates arrive in washington for an international aids conference, we have two progress reports: gwen ifill gets an update from the director of the united nations program on aids. >> brown: and we assess the epidemic here in our nation's capital, where the infection rate is the highest in the country. >> we have people who will be tested repeatedly in hopes that one of those tests will be negative so that they can say i don't have.i.v. we have people who think they can pray their h.i.v. away. >> suarez: plus, as part of his ongoing series, hari sreenivasan talks with native americans about the search for solutions to the effects of climate change on their tribal lands. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the lliam and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and
in its most important task on its agenda this year. >> brown: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice minced no words after russia and china once again vetoed a resolution that threatened sanctions on syria. >> one can only hope that one day before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow this council to play its proper role at center of the >> brown: it was the third time moscow and beijing have blocked u.n. efforts to make syrian president bashar al-assad stop the attacks on his own people. and this latest veto drew condemnation from country after country. >> mr. president today was an opportunity lost, history will show us price that the people in syria and beyond will have to pay. >> by exercising their veto today, russia and china are failing in their responsibilities as permanent members of the security council to help resolve the crisis in syria. >> ( translated ): in our judgment that resolution was best opportunity and perhaps the only opportunity to put an end to the mindless violence that affects the syrian arab republic. >> br
monetary fund says the u.s. economy is recovering, but it's still very fragile. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, armed with an i.m.f. report issued today, christine lagarde warns that u.s. policy-makers must be careful not to overdo debt reduction. >> to bring the debt under control, action needs to be taken over a period of time. that is not just next year. that is going to extend for the next ten years. it needs to be gradual, not so contractionary that the economy folds. >> woodruff: we have an update on efforts across the country to recover from wildfires, extreme heat, and power outages. >> brown: susan dentzer of the journal "health affairs" answers questions many of you are asking about how health care reform will work, now that the supreme court has weighed in. >> for somebody who is running a small business, what does this new health care plan... how does that impact future busess owners? >> brown: margaret warner interviews mexico's new president-elect, enrique peÑa nieto, about drug war violence and relations with th
the week's news. >> suarez: a follow-up to our recent story about smart meters used to monitor energy use. spencer michels reports on california activists who want to ban them. >> pacific gas & electric one of the nation's largest utilities has had to fight a coalition of people who suspect, among other things, that smart meters may be bad for your health. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: once again today, americans absorbed the news of a mass shooting-- a dozen dead, at least 59 hurt or wounded. it happened in the city of aurora, just east of
one bullet. it's not a machine gun. and it's popular because it is a versatile rifle that is used by literally millions of law-abiding people for hunting. it's only good for deer. it wouldn't be powerful enough for something larger. but for hunting, for self defense and for target shooting. >> ifill: congresswoman. what i wanted to say is the gentleman used the word apolitical. let's be real. this is one of the most political issues we have. the national rifle association in many ways owns the united states congress. spending over $7 million in the 2010 election cycle, close to $3 million on its lobbying activities. it says that it will score legislation, meaning it will rate legislators on how they vote. any kind of a crazy bill, even one that says in bankruptcy $3,000 worth of weapons will be protected, passed the house of representatives with over 300 votes. the threat that the national rifle association says that worked. any kind of rational debate about gun safety legislation... >> ifill: let me ask mike dimock about that. i'm curious as to whether this debate boils down to t
, but the latest look at the u.s. economy today suggests a full recovery is still a long way off. the struggle was highlighted in a report from the commerce department. consumer spending powers the u.s. economy, but americans weren't hitting the stores this spring, and when they did, they weren't spending nearly as much. as a result, economic output, measured as the gross domestic product, rose at an annual rate of just 1.5% from april through june. the commerce department did raise its estimate of first quarter growth to 2%. still, that's not considered sufficient to encourage hiring and bring down unemployment. at the white house, spokesman jay carney pointed to 12 straight quarters of growth, but acknowledged it's not enough. >> we obviously, despite this, sustained growth, despite the private sector job creation, are still in a position where we're pulling ourself out of the very deep hole caused by the great recession. and there is still, of course, a great deal of anxiety in the country about the economy. >> woodruff: mitt romney's campaign charged the new numbers are further proof of "a
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: the u.s. economy grew at a sluggish pace in the second quarter this year as americans cut back on spending. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the newshour tonight, we get two views on what the lackluster numbers mean about the strength of the recovery. >> woodruff: then, we update the colorado shootings as court documents reveal the suspect was being treated by a university psychiatrist. >> warner: as the games begin in london, ray suarez examines what host cities get out of the olympics. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> warner: and we close with the scandal that's rocked beijing, after the wife of a chinese official is charged with murder. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf carnegie corp and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your
provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the world got a look today at the man who allegedly gunned down scores of people in aurora, colorado, on friday. he appeared at his initial court hearing as police pieced together what led up to the assault in a movie theater. >> please be seatedded. ifill: it was the first time he had been seen publicly since friday's shootings, and james holmes cut a bizarre figure. his hair dyed bright orange, his eyes dazed. it was unclear if he was on medication, but the 24-year-old staredded blankly or not at all... or nodded off. and he never spoke as the judge explained the murder charges against him. afterward district attorney carol chambers said the s
, grenades and some gas masks. these masks were distributed by the regime because it intends to use chemical weapons. >> reporter: some of the fighters here appear to have an islamist tinge. the man in the front seat adorns the black flag of al-qaeda. ( cheering ) and as locals welcome them with open arms, policy makers in the west will no doubt be concerned about where this is leading. by air the regime has launched a relentless counter attack using helicopters and rocks to tame rebellious districts. and more government tanks are on the way. the rebels have managed to seize some heavy artillery. and are using in whatever way they can. but a tank can't defend against these. a mig jet circles overhead. this conflict now appears to locked into a pattern of attack and counter attack on many different fronts. >> woodruff: a white house spokesman said today the use of heavy weapons in aleppo showed the, quote, "depth of depravity" by the government of bashar al- assad. for more on the conflict in syria we turn to youssef amrani, morocco's minister delegate for foreign affairs, the second highest
and that they can basically get weapons and money into syria from that... from the turkish area. so for us it made sense to get a sense of hue who the rebels are to spend time in the region they control instead of trying to cower and hide and go with them undercover from place to place to be in this swath of towns and villages that they control. rough where you have they are relatively safe. free from government assault on a regular basis? >> at this time. if you were to try to look at the map and say "where exactly do the rebels control? everyday it changes a bit, it morphs and changes. on the edges of the area they control the government might take a town back. there was one town when we were there that switched hands between the government and the rebels four times. why? because the government realizes that this border area is important to the rebels. they realize it is a buffer zone and they are trying to regain control but obviously government's army is stretched and its priorities are elsewhere: namely damascus and aleppo. >> woodruff: tell us about the rebels you met. you talked to a number
. >> brown: the troubles with the u.s. economy-- and the possible fallout-- were on full display today. a task force report told of states facing ever-deeper budget holes. but the chairman of the federal reserve withheld any promise of immediate help. ben bernanke came before the senate banking committee acknowledging that the economy has suffered a series of setbacks. a slump in hiring and job growth, a slow down in manufacturing activity can reduce spending by consumers. while fighting the trend, the fed chair would not commit on if or when the central bank might act again to boost growth. >> we're looking very carefully at the economy, trying to judge whether or not the loss of moment actual we've seen recently -- momentum we've seen recently is enduring and whether or not the economy will make progress to lower unemployed and more satisfactory labor market conditions. if that does not occur, obviously we have to consider additional steps. >> senators from the two parties pushed bernanke in opposing directions. tennessee republican said the fed should take no new steps leaving it in
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)

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